Taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press. Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet 2019-02-27

Taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press Rating: 7,7/10 1204 reviews

Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet (The MIT Press) eBook: Varun Sivaram: explaindiosoftware.com: Kindle Store

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

But the best method of storing electricity, pumped storage, is expensive and dependent on favorable terrain. As long as humans continue to use and demand electric at all hours, without the ability to scale up clean power to meet that evening demand, the ice caps are toast. He is also a senior research scholar at the Columbia University Center for Global Energy Policy and a board member for the Stanford University's energy and environment intitutes. If there were a cheap and scalable method of storing electricity, the prospects for solar would be better. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references pages 291-341 and index.

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Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet: Varun (Philip D. Reed Fellow for Science and Technology, Council on Foreign Relations) Sivaram: explaindiosoftware.com: Books

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

The book is accessible to both industry insiders and novices as it introduces concepts clearly before elaborating. The result is the authoritative, balanced, and comprehensive text that the field has been waiting for. An excellent book with great insights into the state and possible futures of the solar industry. Alarmingly, these facts have been overlooked by most researchers and the industry is bound to face a bottleneck if these issues are not addressed. We all need to work the problem and be part of the solution. His book is a great read for those interested in energy, but maybe more specifically for policy wonks. Forbes named him one of the 30 under 30 in Law and Policy, Grist selected him as one of the top 50 leaders in sustainability, and Klout ranked him as one of the top 5 global thought leaders on solar energy.

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the sun: innovations to harness solar energy and power the with Dr Varun Sivaram

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

A Council on Foreign Relations Book This book paints a very bleak picture of the future, and I found myself walking away from it doubtful that the nations of the world would be able to make their commitments to the Paris Accord. Reed Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations. At least 75% of the cost is for mundane things like concrete, steel, power lines, land, etc. Mr Sivaram argues the reverse. Since solar cells and integrated circuits are both manufactured using silicon wafers, the author assumes that something like Moore's Law must apply to solar cells. Norman Rogers writes often about climate and energy.

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Chasing Sunbeams: Taming the Sun and Solar Energy

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

Natural gas can deliver electricity for less than 5 cents. Teaching an old technology new tricks. Plucked from his final year in a Ph. New engineering would create reactors that run for 25 years without refueling. Undersecretary of Energy The power of solar energy has transformed on-grid and off-grid energy access discussions, yet many are not aware of these tremendous advances. Thinking the problem through and looking at alternatives to what has gotten us to our current state is what this book does well. The graph below is from the book and purports to show that the cost of solar power is now cheaper than the U.

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Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet by Varun Sivaram

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

None of these anecdotes distracts from his central argument—that the silicon cell, a worthy workhorse of the solar revolution, can carry the burden only so far. Although it didn't feel like it was the intention of Varun to explain solar energy in detail, the book actually ended up as a nice contemporary introduction to current state of affairs in solar. It lays out the history, promise, and pitfalls of solar technology with an easy-going lack of wonkishness. Taming the Sun's singular purpose is to convince you of the necessity of investing in early-stage solar energy technologies, but in the process, Varun Sivaram delivers a simply-stated and comprehensive summary of the intertwined issues solar faces in scaling to a level that will deliver global carbon benefits. Technological innovation could replace today's solar panels with coatings as cheap as paint and employ artificial photosynthesis to store intermittent sunshine as convenient fuels. However, solar cells don't become smaller, because they need to collect sunlight, and the amount of energy they collect is proportional to the area they occupy.

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Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Pl…

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

Some, such as solar farms in outer space, may sound outlandish. Paradoxically, Fukushima has made most nations and companies involved in pushing the envelope on newer safer reactor designs retreat and disinvest. Under favorable conditions, the average power produced is about 25% of nameplate capacity. The book is not gloomy. For that reason, I could not put this forth as an explicit criticism, or there might have been four stars.

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Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet (MIT Press)

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

A Truman and a Rhodes scholar, he holds degrees from Stanford University in engineering physics and international relations, with honours in international security. Although solar can't power the planet by itself, it can be the centerpiece of a global clean energy revolution. He says that innovation needs to accelerate in three distinct areas, and he's probably right. Norman Rogers writes often about climate and energy. I have appreciated, in particular, the analysis given of the silicon valley clean-tech boom and bust of An excellent book with great insights into the state and possible futures of the solar industry.

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Chasing Sunbeams: Taming the Sun and Solar Energy

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

New engineering would create reactors that run for 25 years without refueling. And systemic innovation could add flexibility to the world's power grids and other energy systems so they can dependably channel the sun's unreliable energy. The book is filled with outright errors. For instance, it might come as a surprise to you, but simply installing more and more solar panels across the world is not the answer, net metering while consumer friendly it probably bad for the collective, and that value deflation is going to slo Excellent intro to renewable energy for anyone interested in the field. This book is full of useful information, a pleasure to read, and more generally a model for how to write about science, technology, and policy. Forbes named him one of the 30 under 30 in Law and Policy, Grist selected him as one of the top 50 leaders in sustainability, and Klout ranked him as one of the top 5 global thought leaders on solar energy. But in Taming the Sun, energy expert Varun Sivaram warns that the world is not yet equipped to harness erratic sunshine to meet most of its energy needs.

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Chasing Sunbeams: Taming the Sun and Solar Energy

taming the sun innovations to harness solar energy and power the planet mit press

Unleashing all this innovation will require visionary public policy: funding researchers developing next-generation solar technologies, refashioning energy systems and economic markets, and putting together a diverse clean energy portfolio. These innovations are based on good theory, and only engineering is needed. Unleashing all this innovation will require visionary public policy: funding researchers developing next-generation solar technologies, refashioning energy systems and economic markets, and putting together a diverse clean energy portfolio. Instead Varun Sivaram of the Council on Foreign Relations, a think-tank, issues a timely warning that solar power could stagnate as abruptly as nuclear did as a share of global energy in the 1990s, with dire consequences for the planet. Paradoxically, he describes a counter intuitive concept of solar value deflation that occurs with solar's inescapable time-of-day delivery nature and how adopting too much solar as its prices continue to decline, leads to its devaluing during daylight and the increased value of competing energy sources beyond that time.

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